Tag Archives: Work space

What Time is It?

17 Jan

What time is it?

Please don’t tell me that the clock last night was right when I finally went to sleep at 4:00 A.M.

Sleep deprivation is no joke.

Take time for the things you need- like sleep. But know when you can afford to work instead of sleep.

Take time for the things you need like sleep. But know when you can afford to work instead of sleep.

The clock was right, as it turned out, that I stayed up until 4:00 A.M. doing what I love to do… bead.  This is another curse of a creative mind. There are seemingly constant visual images, brain-storm ideas, “aha” thoughts just waiting to be tapped into. When the creative thoughts pile up, what do you do?

If you are like me, you act on the impulses and the mood.  While it is true that you can feel more creative at different times of the day, for me I can’t pass up the opportunity to act on the urge to be creative. The situation doesn’t seem to pass.  To suppress my creative urges end up rendering me just plain crabby.

No matter what the clock says, I have the luxury of making and maintaining my own work hours. So, if I happen to have a creative streak in the wee hours of the night, I just go with it. I have learned to just go with the flow.  Sometimes, if I pay heed to the clock and live by the tick-tick, I find myself stressed in other ways. I become tied to the feeling that I have to work in a specified time frame and I can’t explore at a relaxed pace.

 I have noticed for me that if I am working on something new or challenging, those are the times that I automatically and naturally lose track of time. When you are on a roll, you are on a roll! The time dedicated to art that I create in the middle of the night takes on a special meaning. My occasional late night or early morning work efforts are very intense and focused. I know that I could be (and maybe should be) asleep, so I am aware that what I am working on is worth my time away from getting my needed ZZ’s.

My rationalization for  giving into a work streak at odd hours is simple.  I can always take a power nap the following day if I need it.  That is my plan “A”. With that solution in my mind, I use the time that I feel the most creative to work, work , work.  Most times these bursts are very productive. It is a quiet time in my work space. No phone interruptions, no television, background noise, no radio, no foot traffic, no hunger or thirst issues, and working in the comfort of pajamas is a perk.

Whatever the underlying cause for sleeplessness, when I turn my time into productive creative time, I get a feeling of accomplishment at the start of the following day. How do you use your energy when you have a creative spurt in the wee hours? Is it worth it to you to lose valuable sleep in order to satisfy a creative urge? If you can’t sleep and can’t use your sleeplessness to a work advantage do you have a “plan B”?

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Today, I woke up to eight completed bracelet projects and four pin projects. I’d call that worth the lack of sleep I may have sacrificed. Feed your creative spirit. I fed mine a heaping  bowl of  “sleep” and I am still in a great mood and alert, ready to create again.

Learn how to manage your time so you can enjoy the occasional all-niter because you may never know when it will produce great things.  Wish me sweet dreams, because I will be ready to hibernate later tonight.

My words of advice: Pace your creativity, not the floors with sleeplessness.

The Curse of a Beader

12 Jan

Making beautiful beads in my workspace: Club Creative Studio, Veronica Campos-Hallstrom

Making beautiful beads in my workspace: Club Creative Studio, Veronica Campos-Hallstrom

 

Club Creative Studio’s Feature Friday blog has a continued focus on creativity. Today, the topic is the beader, the creative jewelry maker that creates with beads. The quirks of a person who is addicted to beading is unique. If you know someone who beads or will soon get into the art of beading you can consider yourself warned and informed after reading this funny write-up from bead artist Jen Van Benschoten who is also the editor of Beading Daily at http://www.dailybeading.com

 

Editor and bead artist: Jennifer Van Benschoten

Editor and bead artist: Jennifer Van Benschoten

You Might Be a Beader, If…

“We beaders have very distinct patterns of behavior, wouldn’t you agree? Sometimes, I catch myself doing something, and I think, gee, only a real beader would do something as crazy as this. Do any of these sound familiar to you?”  I am sharing in a segment of the newsletter from The Daily Beader. I can totally relate and wanted to share this great point of view that others can relate to as well.

Five Warning Signs That You Might Be a Beader

Everyone’s dining room table looks like this…right?
You might be a beader, if…you haven’t seen the surface of your dining room table in the last six months. Yes, this also applies to your coffee table, kitchen table, sofa, or favorite armchair, too. In my case, the beads tend to overflow from my little corner office desk in the living room into the dining room, into the bedroom, and even into the kitchen once in a while. Do those little beads have legs, or what?  Yes, I believe that beads take on a life of their own, moving where you are and multiplying very fast too. Although I have a designated workspace, my studio sometimes expands to the same places that Jennifer mentioned as well as a few other places. Sometimes I bead in the car, in a hotel room, and outside. Beads just pile up in unexpected places.

You might be a beader, if…you’ve ever made a New Year’s resolution to buy less beads and use more of what’s in your stash. Admit it, when you thought about what you wanted to change in 2013, you probably thought that you wanted to do more beading projects to use up all the beads you have in your stash. I did, too, until I saw that one of my favorite online bead suppliers had a brand-new stock of Rizo beads. That resolution didn’t even last a week, I’m ashamed to say.  The thing about using the term”stash” only really means that we want to keep something, not really keep it to use for a later date. Beaders get attached to their beads, it is one reason why it is sometimes hard to give my art away to the public, so much of an artist’s soul goes into creating the hand-made beads that I include in my jewelry art.  I did not resolve to buy less beads but, I did resolve to make more beads!

You might be a beader, if…you start six new beading projects before you finish the first one you originally started. This could be why my beads tend to spread themselves out all over the house. I started a bead-weaving project on one of my new Bead On It boards, and then before I was halfway finished with that one, I had an idea for another beading project that I just couldn’t wait to get started! Thankfully, I had another empty beading board, so I started that beading project. But then I ran out of room on my desk, so I parked the new project on the dining room table…and so on. It’s almost like I suffer from Beader’s Attention Deficit Disorder or something.  I tend to jump from work space to workspace within my studio if I am in the experimentation mood. Otherwise, I try to discipline myself.  I try to stick to one project at a time so that I can focus and dedicate the needed attention to one piece of art at a time, and check off the customer’s project as quickly and as professionally as I can without a start and stop interruptions.

A drawer full of brown seed beads, yet I can’t find just the right color… You might be a beader, if…you have four cabinets full of seed beads, but you don’t have just the right color for your current beading project. This happens to me all the time. Yes, I really have four cabinets, each with seven drawers, that are full of seed beads in pretty much every size, shape, and color you could imagine. So why is it that I can never find just the right color for my latest beaded jewelry design idea? I have no idea, but when this happens, it’s really hard to keep that resolution not to buy any more beads and use more of what’s in my stash.  I do not work with seed beads often enough to have a large collection of them.  I can see the problem of running out of them however, because they are often sold in small quantities and you never know when you need a huge amount for a project. I am unique to this situation because I am at an advantage in making my own beads. I create custom colors so I do not have to rely on a manufacturer supplying the “perfect” matching color.
You might be a beader, if…you’ll spend $300 on seed beads, but you buy all of your clothes at the local thrift shop. Not that shopping at the local thrift shop is a bad thing. I mean, my local thrift shop is where I found my favorite cheetah-print cashmere sweater for a mere $2! Saving money on clothes means more money for beads, right? (At least, that’s what I keep telling myself.)” It is true that if you are a beader, your perspective and priorities are different from others concerning extra cash.  I love to get that spree thrill rush from being in a bead or craft store and discovering all of the treasures there.  Bringing my bag of goodies home is like Christmas. I can’t wait to open the packages and get started on a project. Inspiration can come from a bag of  buttons, findings, wire or any other supply we use in our designs.

Jennifer and I both ask if you know anyone that has or does display behaviors like the suggestions above.  We both agree that there is no cure for being a beader, and that using up beads in a vicious cycle of creation is a good thing.

If you would like to experience the beads that have been in my stash and used for Club Creative Studio art, please visit the evolving inventory on the website:

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

 

Creative on Contact (Part l)

10 Jul

Club Creative Studio likes to reserve the Tuesday post for low-cost creative projects.  Today’s Two-Cent Tuesday post is another way to use your stored up creativity in a low-cost manner.  Decorating can be costly but, there are ways to avoid that if you use your imagination.

This is a fun project with low-cost factors.

Among the many types of individuals that are penny-pinching these days are the many college bound and college dorm resident students.  You don’t have to be among is category to celebrate your creativity in this suggested project but, it is an ideal solution to decorating and personalizing your dormitory walls, or any wall.  Turn your doodles into art.

This post will feature the art of my daughter and her project intended to decorate and place her mark and personality upon her walls of her future living space.  Last year she had a focus on using post it notes to decorate her plain white walls of her dorm.  This year her space will be colorful and personal as well.  She is using clear contact paper as her medium. This sticky on one side only plastic is low-cost at less than six dollars for a roll of transparent Contact brand paper.  She also used her colorful Sharpie brand permanent markers.  It would be helpful to also use a flat long surface to work on.

My daughter used clear Con-Tact Brand in this decorative project.

To begin, gather your Sharpie brand markers, they work best because they are colorful and adhere nicely to the slick surface of the Con-Tact paper.  You may wish to use additional paper underneath the ends of the paper so that the markers do not damage your work surface. Sharpie brand markers are permanent markers.

Unroll and begin at one end of the paper and start your decorative doodles.  You can letter quotes, draw illustrations, write down positive affirmations and mantras and stick photos or cut outs under a section of the clear paper.  Whatever you put on or under your sheet of paper will show up nicely through the transparent and protective adhesive plastic sheet.

A section of my daughter’s wall art project.

Consider your designs to coordinate with the color of your wall.

It took a while to add to the entire roll. So you may want to do this project as a group art project or invest time if you do this as an individual.  My daughter intends to use her entire decorated roll as a wall border.  She will place it as a wide strip across her focal wall at eye-level to add a splash of color to her over-all decorated wall.  If there is additional left over after fitting to the space she wants covered, she was thinking of also placing a strip or sections onto her floor.  Con-Tact paper will be easily removed later and can be used on many type of surfaces safely.  She has used it on her mirrors to decorate the corners of them, on her desk-top to decorate that work space, on cabinets as cut-outs like decals or stickers would be used and she has also used this method of decorating on her windows.  A whole lovely theme could be incorporated with this very low-cost method.  Best of all, when removed, you can change out your theme or decorative written focus.

In this section: My daughter incorporated ovals as “fill-in-the-blanks” for others to add their “two-cents” to her wall mural creation.

This self-adhesive is a little tricky to apply alone if you use a whole sheet, so have some help on hand when applying.  Make sure that you have an idea of the total length you wish to cover, do some measuring or cutting.  apply to a clean, smooth surface. You can use a squeegee or wall paper smoothing tool to aid in getting bubbles out of paper when you flatten it to the wall.  Your hands rubbing across the surface will do well enough however, if you take the application process slowly.

It is NOT recommended to apply to wood or any water-based paint unless it is given a coat of varnish or shellac because it will stick and be removed with residue from this type wall. Test the wall if you have concerns.  For best results in application, the manufacturer of Con-Tact suggests that the surface be above 55 degrees farenheit  or  13 degrees celsius for best results.  They also mention that some shrinkage may occur so overlapping can be done.  This is also helpful to do if you are concerned about edges being touched or rubbed.

Draw directly on the Con-Tact paper to create your unique designs.

When you peel off the backing, you want to try to do this evenly.  For covering a wall which is a very large section, it is best to have help and peel small sections.  We will be doing this together in a few weeks so I will be sure to blog about how this turns out at a later date.

For now, I’d also like to share that one technique of application could be to begin at the middle (center) of your wall and press outwards towards the edge.  You may also use a ruler or cloth to smooth out the bubbles that may form when applying. We like this material because it can be lifted to reposition easily and get out any wrinkles that are formed. It is fun to see your wall “come to life” with your art. I can hardly wait to see what my daughter’s art looks like up on her wall.

This material is plastic so you should be aware that pulling too hard will stretch and distort your paper and in turn your images. Use care to place your finished project on the wall of other surface you wish to adorn.  If you are planning to cut your paper at any point, it is nice to also know that the back of Con-Tact brand paper they have pre-marked straight lines to follow to ensure a straight cut, they have also marked with measurements, so that is such a handy-dandy element to help you adhere and alter your paper art.

Make your banner art as long or as short as you wish.

Be sure to visit the blog again in the near future to see how her project looks in her living space.  I’d also love to hear if you try this method of low-cost decorating yourself.  Good luck and happy creating. We are CREATIVE EVERY DAY and hope that you experience fun as you attempt this project sometime yourself.

Creative Space

25 Jun

Creativity can be sparked by your surroundings and fitting that my blog topic today is about how my surroundings have changed and inspired creativity.

Recently, moving the workspace studio to a new location was a bitter and sweet experience.  I transferred my supplies to a smaller but more controlled area.  Some of my storage ideas are the same and some have been adapted to the space and needs and new shelving of the new creative space.  I find my creative space to be inviting, inspiring and functional.

Decorative floral decals add a splash of whimsy and are totally removable and replaceable.

For me and my Studio Space bigger was not necessarily better for several reasons, I need to have a focus on easy-to-reach tools and supplies in a more controlling and tidy area.

My supplies need to be close at hand to use quickly.  I have found that arranging my supplies that I  use often to be within an arms reach works out to be a more productive solution.  I don’t need much room to work. I used to have a large table/desk area for designing.  Today, I have found that I am more focused and have more control of tool use if I am limited in my desk surface.  It has also made new sense to me to try a different approach to how I go about using my supplies and beads.

I am trying very hard to keep this tidy look because it is such a functional area that works for me the way I have it arranged.

I have decided to TRY to replace all of my supplies at the end of each project to their proper storage area.  Before this type of dedicated designing, I was searching many times for something that I needed:  a tool or small findings that were often times right in front of my face which were previously over-looked due to clutter and confusion in the first place!

Being more conscious and careful of my workspace has proven to cut down on the amount of extra supplies I have out and then eventually the amount of time that is needed to clear a space for a new fresh beginning.  I think I am going to like my new-found love of organization.  What do you think of my creative space?

I have created “work zones” which help me focus on the tools that I need in one specific area with each specific art medium.

This is one view of a few separate and distinct “work zones” I have created.  The area in the photograph above is my “clay zone”.  It is where all of my supplies are arranged so that making beads with clay and clay tools are all together in one spot.  So far, I have managed to keep it a clean and productive work area.  When I sit in each zone, I know what my focus is and should be.  Being in focus is step one to productive creativity.

Other such work zones I have created are 1.  The Design Table (which is a small corner desk close to the pull-out drawers where a variety of my beads are located), 2. The Work/Display Table (small table with a cute fabric cover to serve as a flat surface for larger projects), 3. The Clay Zone (as described above) and 4. Storage zones (shelving and closet space organized to house anything I would need for both jewelry-making, painting and other arts/crafts projects.  It is surely a fun place to create. I am inspired even MORE  to use my creative energy and to

BE CREATIVE EVERYDAY!

For a look at creative items designed in my work space, please visit the Club Creative Studio link:

 http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

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