Tag Archives: visual learner

Creativity: Pass It On

15 May

Club Creative Studio shares information about CREATIVITY.

Today, is Two-Cent Tuesday and that means I blog about low-cost creativity.  I’d like to share a suggestion that is also a “no-brainer” activity for the one that is somewhat crafty or artistic already.  If you look upon your artistic time as a place to experience personal serenity or creative growth as a creative outlet for personal growth, take some of that time to consider sharing your passion for the arts.

There are opportunities for creative growth in sharing the passions for arts you have with others around you or in the community.  There are opportunities for sharing your trials and errors by blogging about your experiences, teaching your craft, being an active participant in a formed group supporting the arts or allowing someone to work alongside of you while you physically create art.  Help the visual learner experience creative growth from your artistic expressions.

Share the love, and reasons why you create.  Pass the ideas of creativity along.  Show someone else how your passion makes you feel. Pass on the creativity bug, and you may find that you grow in appreciation and idea-flow as well.  Watching the wheels turn from other creative people is contagious and inspiring.

Creativity: Pass it On. Share your passion with others.

If you are busy being creative in your space anyway, just invite someone to explore your supplies alongside of you. Having creative company gives you someone to get instant feed-back from if you are sharing questions and experiences.  Creating along side someone, gives you on-the-spot ideas that turn into motivation and courage to try something new in technique.

Helping make beads with Club Creative Studio.

You can be the model and mentor and not even realize it by merely allowing someone to work along side you.  As an example of being a creative model, take into account the times that you sit near a child simply “playing” with clay.  Perhaps the very young do not know how to make a “clay snake”.  By offering a “copy-cat” situation, seeing becomes doing and thus, you have shared creativity.

Creativity: be a creative model.

By sharing time when you offer unstructured guidance, you give the gift of confidence to someone exploring their own creativity.  How will you nurture creativity in others today?

Hand-made gift idea framed scrapbook page and mini-photo book.

As school days end with summer vacation near, the art classroom does not have to disappear until next year.  Nurture creativity around you and encourage, inspire, prompt and challenge creativity to be explored in everyday life.  Creativity is indeed contagious.  Pass it on, and see how it spreads!  Happy creating to you and yours!

For more creative prompts, please check out past blog posts.  And follow the creativity on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/ClubCreativeStudio Push the like button and you’ll see additional ideas on how creativity and the creative process is explored.  I share creative creations at http://www.clubcreativestudio.com You will want to check that out, as the creative ideas are plenty!  Have a great time as you are inspired or inspire others to Be Creative Everyday!

Take It or Leaf It

8 Nov

Successful Leaf Rub

Today’s Two-Cent Tuesday post gives you a prompt to explore the great outdoors and take advantage of the season of Autumn.  If you are in a different season where you are located have no fear you can still do this leaf project in your area if you have access to trees and plants.

Staying true to low-cost activities, today is no exception as you learn how you can create on a limited budget.  This activity requires some time outside as well as inside.  It is perfect for children of various ages, and it is easy to do with limited resources.  Leaf rubbings!

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Leaves.  A variety of leaves in different sizes and shapes work well.  The color does not matter.

Paper.  As long as the paper is not too thick, you can do a successful texture rub with most types of papers.

Crayons.  If the wrapper from the crayon is removed, the side of the crayon can be used in a rubbing, along with the side of the point.

Optional:  Tape, paper clips, or clothes pins can be used to secure a leaf from possible shifting under the paper.

Making use of the falling leaves from trees and plants in your area can be fun. First, gather a variety of leaves. For best results leaves that are still a bit supple work best however, they should not be damp or wet. If a leaf is too dry, it will crumble easily and your rub will be difficult to do properly.

Place a leaf directly under a sheet of paper. Using the side of a crayon rub the crayon against the leaf to reveal its pattern from under the paper. As you rub you will see the veins and details of the leaf shape emerge before your eyes. Try to overlap your rubbings for an interesting look and alternate colors for additional uniqueness. Try incorporating different items from around the house and see what texture you can pick up as relief. Be careful as to hold the paper secure for the best results. Tape, paper clips, or clothes pins can be used to hold down the leaf from slipping but remember to remove it before rubbing the surface or an unwanted texture may be created.

Colorful Fall Leaf Rubbing. Now you can say that you've seen a blue and purple leaf!

Additional:

Water color paints, paint brush, cup of water. A quick “wash” of paint over the paper surface can seep color into the art while the areas with wax crayon will resist the paint, creating an interesting added effect.

Explore More: 

After rubbing, try to crinkle up the paper by wadding it in a ball and tightly smash to make fold creases in the paper. Once folded flat again do a water-color wash over the paper and watch in amazement how your work changes!  Children love to ball up the paper like they are going to throw away their creation.  Simply remind them not to be too rough as to rip the paper. They are happy when they can take several easy steps in a project at their own pace and can experience open-ended art.  I know, this has always been a favorite Fall art lesson plan exploring texture, technique and color mixing.

Texture rub using coins.

This creative exercise may not be a new discovery to try but, hunting for items that will make an interesting rub can be.  Be on the lookout for anything with texture that is fairly flat.  Consider these ideas: lace, buttons, tape and glue adhered to paper before rubbing begins, stencils, puzzle pieces etc.  Use your imagination. Take these suggestions or “leaf it”.  Good luck and have fun creating a unique leaf rub and appreciate nature at the same time.

Connecting the Visual Dots

26 Jan

When it comes to communication, I have read that between hearing and sight, sight is the more important and

backgroundsforcomputers.net

 powerful sense when it comes to communication.  It has been studied and reported that we remember 85-90 percent of what we see but less than 15 percent of what we hear.

………C…o…n…n…e…c…t………………………t……………………h…………….e………………………….d……o……t……s……………

For all of the “visual learners” out there, we get it.  If you want us to learn and remember something be prepared to add to your words by showing your ideas as well. 

Today, people are more visual than ever.  Just look around…we live in a visual world, a visual age.  You can’t escape from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Power Point, video games, television, Kindles, movies,  i phones, 3-D television and other media.  People have grown accustomed to and appreciate having the visual world on hand and at their fingertips.  We expect communication to be a visual experience because of such items in our life.

From: Everyone Communicates Few Connect, by John C. Maxwell I have gained this information for you to consider.

  • 77 percent of all Americans get about 90 percent of their news from television. 
  • 47 percent get all their news from television.
  • Video and Web conferencing are replacing on-site face-to-face sales meetings.
  • Digital video recording systems are becoming commonplace in homes and offices.

Your learning style may be the single most important key to improving your learning experiences.

image: etc-usf-edu

People learn in many ways, like seeing, hearing, and experiencing things first hand. But for most people, one of these methods stands out.  It is important to know about each type of learner but, because I am a visual person with a focus on creativity on this blog, I want to point out what identifies a “visual learner”.  Research has shown that people perform better if they change habits to fit their own personal learning styles.

For example, visual-learning students will sometimes struggle during written essay exams,  because they can’t recall test material that was “heard” in a lecture.  To adapt, if the visual learner uses a visual aide when studying, like a colorful outline of test materials, he or she may retain more information. For this type of learner, visual tools improve the ability to recall information more completely.

A simple explanation of learning styles is this: Some people remember best materials they’ve seen, some remember things they’ve heard, while others remember things they’ve experienced.

I came across this information from: Grace Flemming

Visual Learner Characteristics

Visual learners are those who learn through seeing things. Look over the characteristics below to see if they sound familiar.  A visual learner:

  • Is good at spelling but forgets names.
  • Needs quiet study time.
  • Has to think awhile before understanding lecture.
  • Is good at spelling.
  • Likes colors & fashion.
  • Dreams in color.
  • Understands/likes charts.
  • Is good with sign language.

Learning Suggestions for Visual Learners

  • Draw a map of events in history or draw scientific process.
  • Make outlines of everything!
  • Copy what’s on the board.
  • Ask the teacher to diagram.
  • Diagram sentences!
  • Take notes, make lists.
  • Watch videos.
  • Color code words, research notes.
  • Outline reading.
  • Use flashcards.
  • Use highlighters, circle words, underline.

Best Test Type for Visual Learners:

Diagramming, reading maps, essays (if you’ve studied using an outline), showing a process.

So, if you have declared yourself  a visual learner, you know that you can develop the other methods of learning as well.  Use your creative ways to the best of your ability in any situation and especially in your education. Connect the dots in your creative learning and comprehension.

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