Tag Archives: TNT post

Make It FUNtional

13 Dec

Club Creative Studio’s blog has a focus on creativity.  Today’s post features a simple transformation of art.  I have often found the need to change something based on how I want it to function and serve a purpose for me.  With specific needs in mind, almost anything can be transformed and upcycled with creatively to fit a specific desire.

I recently went on a  gallery and store hop with a friend Lauren, in an area that is full of interesting places.  To mark our memories, I purchased a small piece of art at an import store.  This carved wood piece is from Bali.  Right away, I loved it and I knew how I wanted to display and use this item in my home as a creative form of inventive storage.

Lauren and I with a creative find from Impact Imports, PA

Lauren and I with a creative find from Impact Imports, PA

I wanted a new place to display and hang some of my personal necklaces, for an easy way to locate and admire them.  This carving inspired me to use the bottom portion for this purpose.  The tricky part was to figure out how and where I wanted to place the attached screw-hooks.  As with anything you are about to drill into, you want to make sure that you are making the right decision and make your marks correctly the FIRST time.

These are the hooks I used for my project.

These are the hooks I used for my project.

In order to not deface the art by placing the hooks directly to the front of the art, Lauren had the suggestion to place the hooks from under the bottom lip of this art. That made perfect sense and left me with the option to remove the hooks at anytime, if I wanted to display this in a different manner at any other given time.  The holes could be easily filled later and for the meantime, were at the bottom of the art so it isn’t obvious when and if I removed the hooks.

Added hooks on the bottom lip of this art.

Added hooks on the bottom lip of this art.

Finished art transformed in to a display jewelry hanger.

Finished art transformed in to a display jewelry hanger.

The hooks serve as the resting place for my hanging necklaces. I love the functionality of this and the art as well. It is placed in a room that I see it often, and I appreciate the added functionality of this art. This art has now been adapted to my needs.  I made it personal to me and useful to me.

Have you had the opportunity to alter art? Tell us about your experience and success of your project!  If you are looking to do a similar project, I suggest you make sure you have a stable structure to add your hooks to, making sure that your screws do not penetrate through the wood entirely. Space your hooks evenly, secure with adequate twist, and hang over-all project in a manner similar to hanging framed art, with care and concern for strength of nail choice.  good Luck with your creativity!

A Group Art Prompt

16 Aug

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Club Creative Studio would like to highlight the creativity of a small group of people in this TNT (This-N-That) blog post today.

New Bridge Middle School in Jacksonville, North Carolina was the setting for creativity at the summer Leadership Camp. Five young artists and their instructor led efforts for a group art project . The collaborative works will be proudly displayed.

Take a look at the creative process in the video on our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/clubcreativestudio , and you will see how all parts DO make the whole. This is a project that may inspire you to do in your own way because it is rewarding at all stages of development.

Thank you to the participants and the instructor, and acquaintance Mr. Bernie Rosage, Jr. He will certainly agree that this group art project was created with pride and joy.

Get inspired! This over-all project display technique can be replicated in a variety of canvas sizes, as long as they are anchored securely before and after your wall placement. It reminds me of a puzzle. Happily, their theme is NOT puzzling!

What did you think? Share your thoughts here!

Stop Run-Away Beads

19 Jul

This is a bead stopping component.

Club Creative Studio’s TNT (This-N-That) post today is about a creative solution in bead making.

If you are into stringing, you know that there is nothing worse than spending time with a hand-made item and then experience some degree of failure.  When you are involved with the technique of stringing beads, you want the task to be enjoyable and successful.  You would even like it to be a bit relaxing or therapeutic.

Stringing beads is a rhythm and a pattern.  To avoid  a break in that process, any mishaps like a sudden loss of a completed string of beads falling to the ground is heart-breaking.  I have found the ideal product that can be used to assure that a string of beads will no longer be unstrung if it is left in an undeveloped state of progress.

My small collection of a useful stringing tool.

The interesting stainless steel coiled clips are small items that have a strong hold onto the ends of stringing thread or wire.  Some companies call them “Bead Stoppers” and that is a good name to describe what they do.  They stop beads.  To use, you gently squeeze both ends to open, and place your strand in-between two of the coils and release ends.  The grip allows for the beads to be held until you squeeze the ends once more.

Attaching and end of a beaded strand secures the beads from an accidental spill.

This is used by bead artists who are mid-stream in a project, have many different projects going at once, or want to bundle their beads to a stopping point for storage.  I often use these supportive ends to work from one end to the middle, and then adjust the strand to center the design, and string the other end to match.

These bead stopper coils have easy grip ends.

If you have had frustrations in beading strands and do not like dropping it and starting over, then this is something that you can use to give you back some productive time.  They come in several sizes and you can either use two per strand, placing one strand in an area or use one clip, and separate the coils, and hold one single necklace end to end.

Happy creating and let me know if you use these when stringing or if you are now considering trying them.  I used to use other methods like larger clips or tape but, there is a difference using something that is made specifically for bead-makers, they the (inventors) were really onto something when they created this simple tool for us. It solves a big problem.

Creativity Quotes

24 May

Club Creative Studio recycled and melted plastic bottles were transformed into flowers and added to the painted canvas, along with quotes about creativity.

Inspiration comes in many forms.  Today’s TNT (This-N-That) post, I hope that these choice quotes on creativity inspire you to be creative in your own way.

Recently, I incorporated  a small collection of quotes that inspired me to be creative. They were applied to the canvas art project and will serve as a focal point within my creative work space.  Maybe some of them will strike a cord with you and lend to a creative spark for the times you need to be inspired by a creative quote.

The “Mother-Daughter Project” continues as we add more melted bottle blooms. The goal is to cover the canvas at some point for a complete look.

 

 

 

 

CREATIVITY

Make Art –  Love What You Create – Make Work Into Play – Always Be Creating – Stop Trying To Fit In When You Were Born To Stand Out – Make It Work –

Got Art? – Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken – Creative Minds Are Rarely Tidy – The Secret Of Life Is In Art – Be  Creative – A Hunch Is Creativity Trying To

Tell You Something – Creativity Is the Power To Connect What Is Seemingly Unconnected – Create – Love It! – Find Something You Are Passionate About And

Keep Interested In It – Beauty In Everything – Create With Heart – Take Creative Brakes – You Are The Creator of Your Own Story – Creativity Is Intelligence

Having Fun – Keep Calm…Sparkle On! – Imagine – Branch Out! – Follow Your Dreams –  Enlarge Vision – The Start of Something Different – Try New Things –

Proposed Creative Workflow: Does It Have Heart?

Yes ————> Make It  

No ———–> Don’t Make It

Metal Madness

28 Feb

Club Creative Studio’s blog brings you creative information about creativity.  Today is no exception. Usually, a Tuesday post has an underlining theme of low-cost creativity.  If you count asking a friend for use of their tools instead of buying them myself then it is considered “low-cost” (for me) anyway. Today, I have a madness for medal. I have hit the mark on the subtitle once again: Two-Cent Tuesday, low-cost creativity in a sense.  Sometimes it is wise to borrow tools that you do not have, in order to try out something that they have an expertise of.  And, if you rent tools you can experiment before you invest in supplies that you may have questions about or will not use after all.

Stephen Zawistowski, Stephen Z Metal Designs, Inc. and myself.

My artist friend, Steven Zawistowski, owner and metal artist of Steven Z Metal Designs, Inc. (http://www.stephenzmetaldesigns.com) located in North Carolina prompted me in creativity and also lent his expert advice.  He turns cool into awesome on a daily basis in his workspace by creating art from metals.  He recently offered scraps (which are actually valuable crumbs to me) of metal from his various projects,  for my experimental use.  Once I had the scraps of brass, copper and steel metals in my hand I quickly wondered what I could possibly do with them.  I could see and imagine in my mind’s eye an array of possibilities.  It was like giving a child free reign of a candy store.  My eyes could not have been any wider. What can I do? What will I do? How soon can I attempt anything?

The first idea that came to my mind was the incorporation of small samples cut and inlayed in resin at various depths, attempting to stop the normal discoloration of the metal from air over the course of time, and preserving the colors that I noticed of the metal on that particular day.  I was guessing that would be “cool enough”. Then the next obvious question came to mind.  How do I cut this metal? I was hoping that a jeweler’s saw would be adequate.  I knew that using that tool would take time and would not be as accurate as I was thinking for the forms I had imagined. I had thought of small bits of interesting curves and a variety of shards incorporated in a small area.

I asked Steve what he thought would be the best method for cutting based on what I wanted to possibly do with his scraps. He mentioned the PLASMA CUTTER. The plasma cutter is a small machine with big results. To me, hearing the name I first thought it to be dangerous. I mean really, it sounded like blood (plasma) was going to be a sacrificed in using this tool.  The name did scare me.  But, I forgot for a moment that I was dealing with a professional. Steve invited me to stop by his metal shop to check it out for myself.

Plasma Cutter: model Spectrum 625 Xtreme lr

This model is not what Steven Z had in his shop. This model is more compact but, the cutter is still the same in style and for the same use. His air compressor was quite loud, and  much larger but, the trigger hand-torch was the same as this pictured model version.  As you can see in this photo, the flame shoots out from the gun-like handle and it melts the metal like butter!

Plasma cutter in use.

Needless to say, any reservations I had about sparks or flame quickly vanished after Steve showed me  how to start.  I was like turning cool into awesome alright! So my cutting began!

Plasma cutter trigger ready to cut the scrap bronze metal.

My forms using the plasma cutter from copper sheeting.

The color changes in the metals due to the heat applied from the plasma cutter torch were amazing to see right before your eyes. Here, notice the smooth shapes, the contours of the positive shapes and the interesting left-over negative shapes. I kept an array of both shapes from the finished collected scraps. All of my cuts were free-form cuts.

The first of a few plasma cut metal shapes.

My box of hand-cut metal treasures!

Turning cool into awesome! My cut metal shapes.

We have all heard that practice makes perfect.  Well, using the plasma cutter for the first time was a thrill and I have the bug to practice more but, Steve works with metal on a daily basis as a living…I’d say he is very well-practiced!  His friend Arron had also been taken under his wing the day I visited and here they are at work or I should say…at play!

Aaron Humphrey, Steve’s friend was welding, forging and having fun with his creation in the works- a metal gothic-like rose in metal.

A. Humphrey's iron rose creation. Work-in-progress.

To find out more about what I plan to do with my cut metal, visit the Club Creative Studio business page on Facebook, check back on this blog for a post and check out the website!

Work-in- progress: One of my many ideas for incorporating the cut metal into pendants for jewelry.

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

In The Mood?

8 Jun

It’s This-N-That (TNT) Thursday

Did you know…Your choice of jewelry can suggest your over-all mood and style.  What mood do you wish to be in and convey to others? 

I saw on television commercial recently that mentioned five specific words highlighting American Style in furniture.  When I heard the words on the advertisement, I immediately thought that the same words can also describe style and mood reflected in jewelry.  Club Creative Studio’s artisan creations can help you translate your sense of style into mood-making accessories.  Your personal expressions can be revealed simply by your choice of  jewelry accents.

What are the five featured key words mentioned to describe American Style?

Romance, Vintage, Elegance, Modern, Explorer

Please enjoy the photos provided below to illustrate examples of Club Creative Studio Art that seemingly fit into these various categories.  To view additional hand-made, one-of-a-kind items be sure to check the ever-changing inventory often.

  http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

ROMANCE- Club Creative Studio Art

 

VINTAGE- Club Creative Studio- Art

 

ELEGANCE-Club Creative Studio Art

 

MODERN- Club Creative Studio Art

 
 

EXPLOROR- Club Creative Studio Art

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