Tag Archives: Supplies

Bad News,Good News

3 Jan

Shopping buddies for the day. Be inspired by a fellow artist.

Business owners have a hard job. They deserve hugs.

It is hard to run and maintain a business.  For some, it is a venture that is not long-lived. Whenever a business has to shut its doors and discontinue services to our community I am saddened. It doesn’t matter the reason, there is always a void placed in front of us when someplace we frequent or have support for has closed.

This is the case for a local bead shop in my area. I have only visited and purchased from this particular shop once in the last seven months but, I supported their efforts in bringing the love of beading to many it served.  Perhaps if I had lived closer, I would have been able to take advantage of shopping there more often.  Needless to say, the bad news is the closing of a bead shop.  Now that the owners have decided to close their doors for public business, their bad/sad fortune in closing has become the limited time good fortune and good news for those gaining from their clearance prices.

Find the good in a situation.

Find the good in a situation.

Today, I am going to check out their remaining inventory with another fellow jewelry maker. I have no idea what I will come home with, if anything at all.  I do know that my friend and I have different styles in our creations, so I am sure that if we get anything there to add to our supply list, they will be very different items. That fact alone may be a most interesting tidbit of information to realize in our shopping experience.  What will attract her eye and what will I find interesting or useful in comparison? Our design styles will certainly call for the need to shop with different eyes, for different items.

I think that it is important to spend time with those with similar interests in business.  It is a good opportunity to brainstorm and ask for advice if the other is willing to share information and experiences.  Many times artists feel that they are in direct or indirect competition with each other.  I can see how that belief can be possible but, there is also another side to this situation. I look to others in the same field as partners in a way, because we are along the same path.  Our journey and adventure may be very different but, still a common bond can bring us together.  For the love of beads can’t we all just get along!

Be supportive of fellow artists, they are just like you- creating with love.

Be supportive of fellow artists, they are just like you creating with love.

This is the case with my jewelry-making pals. We all have different styles and customers.  If we happen to ever have the same customers, it is because of their love for art in general.  Styles are individual and pleasing to many.  We make our creations with love and care as artists, no matter what level we are on in our specialty craft. We have opportunities to look to and to look out for our fellow creators.  I am happy to support local businesses and people associated with the common bond of beads.

To take this support to a new level, I have an idea in the works that will allow fellow artists to show support to one another.  Stay tuned to this blog for more information on how I hope to bridge creative people together with others and allow them to share their talents and shine.  I welcome you to “FOLLOW” this blog for updates on future posts. Keep informed of creative ideas from creative people.  Thanks for stopping by the blog today creative friend.  Have you been inspired to support the efforts of a fellow artist more deeply?

Stop Run-Away Beads

19 Jul

This is a bead stopping component.

Club Creative Studio’s TNT (This-N-That) post today is about a creative solution in bead making.

If you are into stringing, you know that there is nothing worse than spending time with a hand-made item and then experience some degree of failure.  When you are involved with the technique of stringing beads, you want the task to be enjoyable and successful.  You would even like it to be a bit relaxing or therapeutic.

Stringing beads is a rhythm and a pattern.  To avoid  a break in that process, any mishaps like a sudden loss of a completed string of beads falling to the ground is heart-breaking.  I have found the ideal product that can be used to assure that a string of beads will no longer be unstrung if it is left in an undeveloped state of progress.

My small collection of a useful stringing tool.

The interesting stainless steel coiled clips are small items that have a strong hold onto the ends of stringing thread or wire.  Some companies call them “Bead Stoppers” and that is a good name to describe what they do.  They stop beads.  To use, you gently squeeze both ends to open, and place your strand in-between two of the coils and release ends.  The grip allows for the beads to be held until you squeeze the ends once more.

Attaching and end of a beaded strand secures the beads from an accidental spill.

This is used by bead artists who are mid-stream in a project, have many different projects going at once, or want to bundle their beads to a stopping point for storage.  I often use these supportive ends to work from one end to the middle, and then adjust the strand to center the design, and string the other end to match.

These bead stopper coils have easy grip ends.

If you have had frustrations in beading strands and do not like dropping it and starting over, then this is something that you can use to give you back some productive time.  They come in several sizes and you can either use two per strand, placing one strand in an area or use one clip, and separate the coils, and hold one single necklace end to end.

Happy creating and let me know if you use these when stringing or if you are now considering trying them.  I used to use other methods like larger clips or tape but, there is a difference using something that is made specifically for bead-makers, they the (inventors) were really onto something when they created this simple tool for us. It solves a big problem.

Creative Space

25 Jun

Creativity can be sparked by your surroundings and fitting that my blog topic today is about how my surroundings have changed and inspired creativity.

Recently, moving the workspace studio to a new location was a bitter and sweet experience.  I transferred my supplies to a smaller but more controlled area.  Some of my storage ideas are the same and some have been adapted to the space and needs and new shelving of the new creative space.  I find my creative space to be inviting, inspiring and functional.

Decorative floral decals add a splash of whimsy and are totally removable and replaceable.

For me and my Studio Space bigger was not necessarily better for several reasons, I need to have a focus on easy-to-reach tools and supplies in a more controlling and tidy area.

My supplies need to be close at hand to use quickly.  I have found that arranging my supplies that I  use often to be within an arms reach works out to be a more productive solution.  I don’t need much room to work. I used to have a large table/desk area for designing.  Today, I have found that I am more focused and have more control of tool use if I am limited in my desk surface.  It has also made new sense to me to try a different approach to how I go about using my supplies and beads.

I am trying very hard to keep this tidy look because it is such a functional area that works for me the way I have it arranged.

I have decided to TRY to replace all of my supplies at the end of each project to their proper storage area.  Before this type of dedicated designing, I was searching many times for something that I needed:  a tool or small findings that were often times right in front of my face which were previously over-looked due to clutter and confusion in the first place!

Being more conscious and careful of my workspace has proven to cut down on the amount of extra supplies I have out and then eventually the amount of time that is needed to clear a space for a new fresh beginning.  I think I am going to like my new-found love of organization.  What do you think of my creative space?

I have created “work zones” which help me focus on the tools that I need in one specific area with each specific art medium.

This is one view of a few separate and distinct “work zones” I have created.  The area in the photograph above is my “clay zone”.  It is where all of my supplies are arranged so that making beads with clay and clay tools are all together in one spot.  So far, I have managed to keep it a clean and productive work area.  When I sit in each zone, I know what my focus is and should be.  Being in focus is step one to productive creativity.

Other such work zones I have created are 1.  The Design Table (which is a small corner desk close to the pull-out drawers where a variety of my beads are located), 2. The Work/Display Table (small table with a cute fabric cover to serve as a flat surface for larger projects), 3. The Clay Zone (as described above) and 4. Storage zones (shelving and closet space organized to house anything I would need for both jewelry-making, painting and other arts/crafts projects.  It is surely a fun place to create. I am inspired even MORE  to use my creative energy and to

BE CREATIVE EVERYDAY!

For a look at creative items designed in my work space, please visit the Club Creative Studio link:

 http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

Q is for Quick

23 Apr

Creating a "quick project" like earrings, allow me to take a break from more time-consuming projects.

Club Creative Studio’s letter focus for the day is “Q”. The letter Q stands for the word quick today.  Although most steps involved in creating our one-of-a-kind beads are not to be considered a “quick” project or process.  It is for this reason, when I am engaged with making clay or glass beads that I often need a break. I try to create something that takes less time so that I can still have a sence of accomplishment at a quicker pace.

Having the option and opportunities to create something quickly can be rewarding for my artistic expression as well as satisfying to a customer’s needs who may like something last-minute.  I am lucky, for example to be able to “whip up” earrings to match any outfit or gift-giving need very quickly because I have the necessary supplies, tools, and skills needed to do so. In today’s mini lesson, I have used store-bought crystal beads and have incorporated my hand-made paper magazine recycled beads in earrings as well to illustrate two very different styles of earrings using the same techniques.

The satisfaction of creating an item from hand is very rewarding. It does not matter if the project is completed in a few steps or if it is more labor intensive. Both processes are a creative experience worth remembering and often times repeating. It is in the repeating that you get your practice time in.  And thus you can create quickly and stress-free.

When I create earrings, they are my “quick fix” projects.  I am able to consider them an easy process because I have had many years of practice creating them.  If you have not tried or have not yet mastered the few steps needed to create simple earrings, give this mini lesson a try to perfect it by repeating the process with practice and added confidence.

Happy Creating!

Tools needed for making earrings.

N is for Necklace

22 Apr

Club Creative Studio creates many different styles of hand-made necklaces.  And, when designing a necklace, there are many factors to consider besides the beads, and findings.  The letter N is for necklace and in today’s blog, I share with you information that you may find useful when designing your own or purchasing a necklace with a specific length you desire. The length of your necklace can be created in a variety of ways and worn to enhance your over-all style.

It may be easier to know the common vocabulary to describe your length needs of a necklace.  Use this chart to become familiar.

Club Creative Studio Necklace. http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

Choker:   14-16 inches (35-40 cm)

Princess Necklace:  18-20 inches (45-50 cm)

Matinee Necklace:  23-24 inches (55-60 cm)

Opera:  30-32 inches (75-90 cm)

Lariat:  40-45 inches ( 100-112 cm)

Sautoir:  Longer than an Opera necklace

Club Creative Studio necklaces vary in lengths.

It is always possible to make a longer necklace shorter or a shorter necklace longer.  When in the design stages, knowing the desired outcome in advance is the key to making it a specific length in the end. Often times an extender (additional links) can be added to the necklace at the ends to make the length adjustable for comfort or convience.

F is for Findings

6 Apr

In the A to Z Blog Challenge, I am blogging today with a focus on the letter f.  F is for Findings.  What are findings?

Findings are not hard to “find” unless you drop a few of them in deep pile carpet. Findings are small elements that are needed to finish a jewelry project when creating it. It can be referred to in many forms.  A finding can be a hook, a closure, a small metal detail like a protective guardian wire, among a few examples.  Jewelry Findings is an old world term used to describe the components which go into the making of jewelry.

Findings used often in jewelry-making are wire hooks, loops, beads and caps, bead cones, clasps, crimps, charms, head pins, and eye pins to name even more.  Most online sites, books, and stores have organized their Jewelry Findings in a few different ways for viewing and shopping convenience. If you know your material and finish preference, you can navigate by the type of material.  Often offered are precious metal, solid metals, or base metal findings. Categories are then further broken down by types of findings.

Findings are not hard to FIND!

Once you know the type of finding you are looking for, you can decide on the various types of specific earring findings, clasps and toggles, bails and component holders to name more.

Sometimes, a finding is a not so common element needed to complete a project.  As examples, a clasp shortener, eye-glass sling, or pin finding and pin clutch fit into that category.

A shortener clasp finding allows you to convert a long strand of pearls or beads to wear it as a double strand. Also called a twister clasp for twisting multiple strands together.

Adjustable eyeglass slings.

Pins and a clinch clutch are sometimes sold separately. Pin findings have a flat top. Pin clutches have flanges that can be pinched to make the clutch easier to remove from the pin. 

Hand-made simple clasp sample.

Now that you can identify what a finding is, you can perhaps appreciate the functionality and details of findings in jewelry art.  Be sure to check out how I incorporate my findings in created art and see if you can spot a hand-made finding in Club Creative Studio items.

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

Inch By Inch

3 Jan

Inch by inch art can be expressed in the smallest of spaces. Art can be made on the smallest of canvas as well.  Today’s post from Club Creative Studio will explore the possible use of a four-inch by four-inch area.  On Tuesdays the post from Club Creative Studio is generally in the theme of a cost-effective thought, project or product.  It’s great to learn of a low-cost idea.

Four inches is not a large space but canvas can come pre-treated with gesso and it is ready to be transformed into art with paint.  Canvas can be found in two-inch by two-inch sizes as well, or even smaller!  I have used mini-canvas to focus on a very intricate painting and as an area with a collage surface.  Both utilize different techniques.  A canvas measured by mere inches can produce tiny treasures that can brighten a small area like a shelf or a desktop.  Placed on a wall in an arrangement it can be used as a filler or grouped to add interest to a space that includes a size variety of art. Canvases grouped in even numbers, separately but placed side by side with space in between to also form a whole image or different displayed shape.

With a focus on a low-cost craft activity, this week’s Two-Cent Tuesday post shares the idea of creating quick art inexpensively.   Have you ever used or considered transforming a treated blank canvas with permanent markers instead of paint?  I recently bought a value pack of small canvas panels in the four by four-inch size. The package had twenty-four total pre-primed flat board canvases.  Instead of buying paint and paint brushes for my daughter, I armed her with a variety of sharp point and thick permanent markers to be used on the canvas as her medium.

These supplies will provide anyone with a creative outlet activity with less mess, prove to be an efficient use of time, require only a small space for storage, and most importantly… it will give the opportunity to create a personalized gift at almost the drop of a hat.  I made my daughter a sample art piece to lend a feel of what she might do herself.

Club Creative Studio mini canvas, 4x4 inches.

Experiment with a variety of canvas sizes.  You may find that you prefer one size over another or have time only for smaller projects.  Just take the challenge to create everyday!

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