Tag Archives: metals

Putting It Together- Cold Connections

3 Mar

Club Creative Studio- Cold connection art

Club Creative Studio has been a busy place.  I have had a great time working with my mixed metal recently.  Discovering how and what I want to create by meshing layered metals in a cold connection (rivet technique) is a fun challenge. Of course, I wish to also incorporate my hand-made beads as well.

I have been working with 24-guage sheet metals. I have found that to be the most beloved thickness to design and make my jewelry with.  My studio is quite noisy when I decide to texture my metal pieces because I am hammering and pounding.  I have a new textured hammer that is double-sided and has interchangeable ends for making interesting designs.  And I also use my chasing hammer as a multi-purpose hammer for smoothing and doming, shaping and riveting. The ball-peen hammer is my main punching tool and I love the surface texture I can pound using this type hammer.

Recently to incorporate my hand-rolled clay beads, I create a pendant using mixed metals and a cold connection, then add Club Creative Studio one-of-a-kind beads to the art.  What a great combination.  To see more, be sure to check on the Facebook page and online. I will be adding sneak peek photographs and items available for in those particular venues.

http://www.facebook.com/clubcreativestudio

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

I will be taking photos of my metal working tools at some point and use them as a blog topic. Would that be of interest to you? Let me know what other tools of my trade you would like to learn more about.  Be creative every day!

 

 

 

Metal Madness

28 Feb

Club Creative Studio’s blog brings you creative information about creativity.  Today is no exception. Usually, a Tuesday post has an underlining theme of low-cost creativity.  If you count asking a friend for use of their tools instead of buying them myself then it is considered “low-cost” (for me) anyway. Today, I have a madness for medal. I have hit the mark on the subtitle once again: Two-Cent Tuesday, low-cost creativity in a sense.  Sometimes it is wise to borrow tools that you do not have, in order to try out something that they have an expertise of.  And, if you rent tools you can experiment before you invest in supplies that you may have questions about or will not use after all.

Stephen Zawistowski, Stephen Z Metal Designs, Inc. and myself.

My artist friend, Steven Zawistowski, owner and metal artist of Steven Z Metal Designs, Inc. (http://www.stephenzmetaldesigns.com) located in North Carolina prompted me in creativity and also lent his expert advice.  He turns cool into awesome on a daily basis in his workspace by creating art from metals.  He recently offered scraps (which are actually valuable crumbs to me) of metal from his various projects,  for my experimental use.  Once I had the scraps of brass, copper and steel metals in my hand I quickly wondered what I could possibly do with them.  I could see and imagine in my mind’s eye an array of possibilities.  It was like giving a child free reign of a candy store.  My eyes could not have been any wider. What can I do? What will I do? How soon can I attempt anything?

The first idea that came to my mind was the incorporation of small samples cut and inlayed in resin at various depths, attempting to stop the normal discoloration of the metal from air over the course of time, and preserving the colors that I noticed of the metal on that particular day.  I was guessing that would be “cool enough”. Then the next obvious question came to mind.  How do I cut this metal? I was hoping that a jeweler’s saw would be adequate.  I knew that using that tool would take time and would not be as accurate as I was thinking for the forms I had imagined. I had thought of small bits of interesting curves and a variety of shards incorporated in a small area.

I asked Steve what he thought would be the best method for cutting based on what I wanted to possibly do with his scraps. He mentioned the PLASMA CUTTER. The plasma cutter is a small machine with big results. To me, hearing the name I first thought it to be dangerous. I mean really, it sounded like blood (plasma) was going to be a sacrificed in using this tool.  The name did scare me.  But, I forgot for a moment that I was dealing with a professional. Steve invited me to stop by his metal shop to check it out for myself.

Plasma Cutter: model Spectrum 625 Xtreme lr

This model is not what Steven Z had in his shop. This model is more compact but, the cutter is still the same in style and for the same use. His air compressor was quite loud, and  much larger but, the trigger hand-torch was the same as this pictured model version.  As you can see in this photo, the flame shoots out from the gun-like handle and it melts the metal like butter!

Plasma cutter in use.

Needless to say, any reservations I had about sparks or flame quickly vanished after Steve showed me  how to start.  I was like turning cool into awesome alright! So my cutting began!

Plasma cutter trigger ready to cut the scrap bronze metal.

My forms using the plasma cutter from copper sheeting.

The color changes in the metals due to the heat applied from the plasma cutter torch were amazing to see right before your eyes. Here, notice the smooth shapes, the contours of the positive shapes and the interesting left-over negative shapes. I kept an array of both shapes from the finished collected scraps. All of my cuts were free-form cuts.

The first of a few plasma cut metal shapes.

My box of hand-cut metal treasures!

Turning cool into awesome! My cut metal shapes.

We have all heard that practice makes perfect.  Well, using the plasma cutter for the first time was a thrill and I have the bug to practice more but, Steve works with metal on a daily basis as a living…I’d say he is very well-practiced!  His friend Arron had also been taken under his wing the day I visited and here they are at work or I should say…at play!

Aaron Humphrey, Steve’s friend was welding, forging and having fun with his creation in the works- a metal gothic-like rose in metal.

A. Humphrey's iron rose creation. Work-in-progress.

To find out more about what I plan to do with my cut metal, visit the Club Creative Studio business page on Facebook, check back on this blog for a post and check out the website!

Work-in- progress: One of my many ideas for incorporating the cut metal into pendants for jewelry.

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

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