Tag Archives: creative thought process

Sharing Bead Soup

17 Feb

IMG_8222

Portion of the Bead Soup I sent to my beading challenge partner Susan,

Club Creative Studio is taking part in the Bead Soup Challenge #7.  It will be fun sharing Bead Soup.

Please review past posts regarding the details of this wonderful sharing and creating challenge for those making hand-made beads and jewelry from them. Since the arrival of my beads from my bead exchange partner, Susan I have had time to simmer the ideas I have and will soon begin my creative thought process and my design using the beads she sent me last week.  I am looking forward to the creative growth.

I have not gotten official word that my box has indeed arrived to New Hampshire however, it has had adequate time. With that in mind, I would like to go ahead and share what I included in my package of fun. The idea of sharing is to highlight some of your own hand-made beads and pair them with interesting items that can be utilized in a creative challenge for the artist on the receiving end to express in their own style.  Lori Anderson is the host and brain-child behind the organization of this particular bead challenge.  It is perfect “soup” , warming my soul on a cold winter day for me living in Philadelphia.  I welcome the challenge.

I included a variety of supplies and I hope she is inspired to do something fun and add her own components if she desires as well. I included items of stone, Czech glass, hand-rolled clay beads, hand-twisted wire worked beads, seed beads, ceramic, rhinestone and metal charm elements just to name a few.

Perhaps she will blog about her experience. I plan to document my creative journey on the Club Creative Studio Facebook page with photos and within this blogging platform. I am happy to share the experience of the creative thought process and creative expression of this beading challenge by sharing my Bead Soup Challenges.

It is my hope that you find the steps that I take interesting and keep in touch as I share the trials and tribulations of this beading challenge. Please check back for future posts on this topic here and on the page: http://www.facebook.com/clubcreativestudio

Club Creative Studio Bead Soup Challenge 7 IMG_8220 IMG_8221 IMG_8222 IMG_8223 IMG_8227 IMG_8233

Creativity As Stress Buster

18 Jan

527748_414488068582815_278916238806666_1288271_783683817_n

Believe it or not, being more creative can allow you to also be less stressed.

Having a creative outlet opens your mind and eyes to new and exciting ways to distress.

What’s your creative stress buster?

I use the opportunity to be creative with art on a daily basis. In this TNT (This-N-That) Club Creative Studio post I’d like share ideas why creativity can come to the rescue in times of stress. My personal and business mantra is Be Creative Everyday!  Having this frame of mind has allowed me to use the arts as a means to be expressive and less stressed in my day.

Focus your mind and hands creatively and you are in for an escape (of sorts) of reality. Being creative takes my thought process to a different out-of-the-box, critical thinking stage.   It helps me forget about the other things that are stressors in my life.  When I am creative, my focus changes to thinking in nonconventional means and I allow myself to grant freedoms of imagination and growth from routine.

Being creative sets my mind free from rules and places me in a state of experimentation.  Gifting the opportunity to ask and act upon questions like “what if”. Recently, I had the misfortune of having technical difficulties.  Within two days of each other , I discovered that I laundered my cell phone and the motherboard of my computer was fried. Talk about some bad luck. My technical difficulties were woes that I had to solved quickly so I could get back on track to where I needed to be personally and in my business. Those are stressful times, when you have to worry about a cost associated with a solution, as well as the time you are going to sacrifice to get back to your normal life when there is a challenge in your mist.

Creativity gave me comfort. Creativity was the sweet diversion from my problems.  Creativity gave me something else to concentrate on while I waited for the outsourced help. In this instance, I had gained time to be more creative because I was not directly involved with my main concerns. You can use creativity as a crutch to help you become stronger in critical thinking skills and thinking differently in general. I think that stress become less prominent if you inject some level of creativity into each situation. Creative thoughts sure take the routine out of the day,  allow your personality to shine, and gift others with alternative points of views. We were all meant to be indivuals and I can think of no better way to express uniqueness than to show your creative side. Give the gift of creativity to yourself or others today and find out if it will serve as a stress buster technique for you in the future.

What will you do to inc0rporate creativity into your life by thought and action? You may start by taking on a simple challenge as this: ask the question: “what if…”

Diedra’s Different Outlook- Part ll

18 Sep

The color of love.

Club Creative Studio introduced you to my neighbor, Diedra in yesterday’s post.  Today I am thankful for having pride in knowing my creative-out-of-the-box-thinking neighbor. Who would not want to know more about how a creative person thinks?  Fitting for the Two-Cent Tuesday theme, I want to show you how the love of one color can have a cost-effective impact. Diedra’s favorite color in her own words is: “The color Peacock”.  It is actually the love of the color turqoise that has her racing to her paint and brush very often.  This interest in painting almost any thing and every thing has also expressed a sense of creative frugality.

Pursuaded by paint of a peacock-color, the rugs, pillows, furniture, and floor reflect that favorite hue.

It isn’t everyday that you can go out into the world and purchase turquoise painted furniture, a statue, flooring, a mailbox or  lawn ornaments.  This is a low-cost way to get that into your world by simply and inexpensively painting an item the way that you want it to look , yourself.  And why not? If you want to love something even more, find a way to make it attractive to you.  Diedra loves “peacock” so she paints many items with that color to reflect what attracts her taste.  You’ll see plenty of turquoise, purple and blue here. Nuff said.

At night- purple lights are scattered here and there in her garden areas.

You are free to consider this decorating style “quirky” but, it is certainly also “cohesive”.

Plenty of turquoise, purple and blue hues here.

Lending to the expressions of the colors purple, blue and turquoise is the personality and spunk of Diedra herself.

Meet Diedra, even her turquoise car has a creative touch.

When asked about the reasoning behind the attached flowers on her automobile roof and back window she responded with her logic. “I go out in the car and park in the parking lots and when I come out of stores I always think that someone has stolen my car because it seems to be parked in between the big SUVs and I can not see it quickly.  So, I put the flowers on top so I could spot it faster. Plus being short, I can see it better over the bigger cars.” Sounds good to me! She went on to add, “I used to change the flowers with the seasons and holidays but, that got to be a bit much.”

Visit the blog again for the continued multi-post series

sharing more of Diedra’s featured creative whims.

The Waiting Game

10 May

Smile during your creative process.

Today’s TNT (This-N-That) post from Club Creative Studio is about technique in your creative process. I often find myself playing “the waiting game”.  You know what this means to an individual on a daily basis. We wait in line, we wait for the mail to come, we wait in traffic, we wait for the dryer to signal the clothes are dry. We wait for the text response, we wait for something to download, we WAIT, WAIT, WAIT!

But wait there is more waiting if you are an artist!  It is what we do with that “wait time” when we are creatively working that is important.  When an artist has down time, time in which we have to wait for something to dry, wait for something to stick together, wait for something to cure, melt, mold, bake, even sell… we need to also occupy that time to be productive.  And guess what?  An artist usually fills their wait time with something that takes even more time to wait for, right?

I often find myself doing tasks in the studio that involve multiple skills, steps or focus.  It is just part of the nature of the beast of putting constructions together, that forces us to wait for one step to be completed before another is started.  Multitasking is nothing new.  Multi-focus is the skill that is in question.  Being able to move from one task to another quickly is productive if you are organized, goal-oriented, and patient.

Organize your stuff!

Organization

When your supplies and work space are organized, your efforts become smooth and there is less time dealing with details that waste time.

Organization offers the flow of creativity because you can see more clearly and tools are readily at hand where you expect them to be.

Order in your space allows you to see the process in front of you without distractions.

Striving to be more organized can form habits that are productive in day-to-day activities outside of your craft.

Set your goals.

Goal-Setting

Being goal-oriented means you have a focus and outcome in mind.  Sometimes in art, that has to be general since we want the over-all outcome to be creative, not totally predicted.

Knowing what you want to do at the start of a process stems from being organized and also grows out of having the foresight of knowing what supplies you need to begin step one.

Inspiration and goals can be used together to give you a mental snapshot of where you want your project to head.  Envisioning the plan and product together sparks creativity.

Patience

No doubt about it deadlines and creativity sometimes do not mesh well but, being patient does have its rewards for reaching a time related task.

Setting the pace for creativity will manage your time more effectively.  Leaving room in the day for trial and error accounts will be less stressful and more successful.

I practice being patient by moving from one task to another.  I try not to get too frustrated with various steps of a complicated or intense project at hand because of those little breaks.

Take into account what your starting point and ending points look like.

Are you organized?

Do you know your goals for your creative process?

Are you patient?

I would like to end this post by sharing one idea that helps me pass time in between projects.  The focus on the REWARD, which is different from the word GOAL.  As a “reward” to myself as a job well done creatively and in celebration of an accomplished task, I take time to savor.  Chocolate and tea work for me!

My “pick-me-up-reward beverage” choice is sweet tea!

Let us know what you do in your daily “waiting game” challenges.  Do you have a routine or helpful hint for others that explains why you can be more creative during the times you have to wait in between steps of a project?  We’d love for you to share your thoughts below in a comment. Thanks for stopping by the blog,  Good luck in your creativity today!

Y is for You (Your Creativity)

28 Apr

Take the steps to be creative!

Sometimes it is a struggle to think creatively, find the time to be creative or have materials on hand to produce an item from your creativity.  I get that. And it might sound familiar to you too. This is why today’s post from Club Creative Studio has a focus on You.  The letter “Y” stands for you today, you and your creative process.  When I say I am “Creative Everyday”, I really am. That is my daily process.  It may not be in the same manner or with the same materials but, I do recognize that it takes effort sometimes to be productive from creative juices, and I strive to make sure that everyday I do something that I consider to be creative in my workspace: Club Creative Studio.

For those times that you think it is not possible to be creative or hard to get motivated, take to heart some of the considerations from the ideas of Gary Gonzales, in the Leadership Journal, as he writes about Real Ministry in a Complex World. Now I know his subject matter is not an art focus. But, when talking about creativity we can gain some insight to his words and thoughts about the creative process as a whole.  He writes about your “creativity quotient” and how to raise the bar in creativity. He  believes that  a few good habits can improve the quality of your ideas.

“Someone once asked William Barclay how he had become such a prolific writer. The key, he said, is learning to apply the seat of your pants to the seat of your chair.

Creativity is far less subjective and ethereal than some make it sound. As much a function of our habits as our “genius” or inspiration, creativity takes discipline. Here are four ways to enhance your creativity.

Know your moods

Perhaps you’ve heard the old saying about diet: “Mornings are gold, lunch is bronze, and dinner is lead.” Well, the same applies to personal energy levels. A few months ago, a lay leader handed me a newspaper article outlining the body’s daily rhythms. It underscored how, for most people, mornings provide peak energy and concentration. Quick recall and analytical reasoning are strongest in the a.m.

Conversely, the infamous “afternoon grog,” the inability to focus, hits from 1 to 3 p.m., with a short reprieve from 3 to 4 p.m., especially in recall.

By evening most people are downshifting, except for the late-night geniuses who hit their creative stride from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Knowing this, I safeguard morning hours for the challenges of praying, studying, writing, and creative thinking. I no longer feel guilty when my engines are revving low. I pace myself, husbanding my energy for creative times.

Do you know what time of day you are the most creative? I fit into that "night owl" category for sure!

Learned how to improve energy and lessen the negative rhythms

Soon after moving to the Twin Cities from Southern California, I thought about joining a fitness club. But I wondered, With my mornings scheduled full with message preparation and my evenings already overflowing with meetings and programs, how can I realistically expect to add an exercise regimen?

But I had heard others describe how a workout increased their energy level, so I decided to experiment. I discovered that a sixty-minute workout during my lunch hour or after 3 p.m. worked wonders. Regular exercise dramatically increased my endurance, making my low periods less low-and I feel better about myself. As an added bonus, I find thinking and praying easier while on the Nordic Track or between weight-lifting sets.

While getting into shape, I learned another valuable lesson: If I work out on Friday, resting or going easy on Saturday, by Sunday morning I’m primed to preach. A one-day layoff between workouts enables my body to bounce back with renewed vigor. I can’t recall a time in my previous fifteen years of ministry when I’ve been so clear-headed-able to think creatively and spontaneously in the pulpit.

Write it down

Someone has said, “Opportunity is like a horse that gallops up and then pauses for a moment. If you don’t get on, before long you hear the clatter of hoofbeats dying away in the distance.”

You have got to start someplace start your creativity at the beginning!

Great ideas are just such opportunities.

Whenever you hear, see, or think a worthwhile thought, write it down before another moment passes. Experience has taught me to keep a pen and paper handy on my night stand.  That’s also true of the ideas we learn from others. For several years I’ve kept a journal handy at my office. Whenever I come across a good quote, I immediately jot it down and document the source. Often, when I’m stymied while preparing sermons, I thumb through this journal to stimulate ideas.

Others’ ideas provoke my ideas. While paging through my journal recently, I ran across the statement, “Leaders are to be imitated, not gold-plated.” It triggered a thought: I’ve wanted to do a series on leadership for some time. Why not develop a series of seven messages on leadership principles using one-liners as memory hooks?

I’m now reading and gathering ideas, illustrations, and resources on that theme.

Let it simmer

Most creative ideas mature over time. So, whether I’m planning a sermon series, a special holiday service, or a seminar, I arrange my time to give it as much advance thought as possible. My mind works best when I’m not clawing for ideas at the last-minute.

I don’t get over structured too early. A good idea has a ripple effect, soon suggesting other ideas or applications. At first, all I want to do is grasp the big picture-even if only a piece of it.

Apology for the language displayed here but, ADMIT IT: we have all felt this way!

Useful ideas sometimes come to me after months of simmering.

Several years ago, I heard the story of Larry Walters, a 33-year-old man who decided he wanted to see his neighborhood from a new perspective. He went down to the local army surplus store one morning and bought forty-five used weather balloons. That afternoon he strapped himself into a lawn chair, to which several of his friends tied the now helium-filled balloons. He took along a six-pack of beer, a peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich, and a bb gun, figuring he could shoot the balloons one at a time when he was ready to land.

Walters, who assumed the balloons would lift him about 100 feet in the air, was caught off guard when the chair soared more than 11,000 feet into the sky-smack into the middle of the air traffic pattern at Los Angeles International Airport. Too frightened to shoot any of the balloons, he stayed airborne for more than two hours, forcing the airport to shut down its runways for much of the afternoon, causing long delays in flights from across the country.

Soon after he was safely grounded and cited by the police, reporters asked him three questions:

“Were you scared?”

“Yes.”

“Would you do it again?”

“No.”

“Why did you do it?”

“Because,” he said, “you can’t just sit there.”

His answer caught my interest. I pondered that story and its implications for several months. Then, as I was preparing a sermon, “The Crisis Called Christmas,” my thoughts came together. I used the Walters story in the introduction to set the stage for the idea that each of the birth narratives called for a response-or a reaction-from its participants. When it comes to God’s intervention in our lives, we can’t just sit there.

image:aboxjourneybutton

Talk about it

Creativity is often synergistic, so I cultivate people in formal and informal settings who cultivate my ideas  I never  know when a brainstorm will strike-and quickly vanish!

Happily, I can relate to this writing and it gives me insight and information to use to step up and recognize my creative strengths and areas of weakness that can be improved upon.  Did you find anything in his writings that might help you relate to being creative in your own life?  I hope so.  Thank you for stopping by the blog today. I hope your creativity grows.

%d bloggers like this: