Archive | work technique RSS feed for this section

The Curse of a Beader

12 Jan

Making beautiful beads in my workspace: Club Creative Studio, Veronica Campos-Hallstrom

Making beautiful beads in my workspace: Club Creative Studio, Veronica Campos-Hallstrom

 

Club Creative Studio’s Feature Friday blog has a continued focus on creativity. Today, the topic is the beader, the creative jewelry maker that creates with beads. The quirks of a person who is addicted to beading is unique. If you know someone who beads or will soon get into the art of beading you can consider yourself warned and informed after reading this funny write-up from bead artist Jen Van Benschoten who is also the editor of Beading Daily at http://www.dailybeading.com

 

Editor and bead artist: Jennifer Van Benschoten

Editor and bead artist: Jennifer Van Benschoten

You Might Be a Beader, If…

“We beaders have very distinct patterns of behavior, wouldn’t you agree? Sometimes, I catch myself doing something, and I think, gee, only a real beader would do something as crazy as this. Do any of these sound familiar to you?”  I am sharing in a segment of the newsletter from The Daily Beader. I can totally relate and wanted to share this great point of view that others can relate to as well.

Five Warning Signs That You Might Be a Beader

Everyone’s dining room table looks like this…right?
You might be a beader, if…you haven’t seen the surface of your dining room table in the last six months. Yes, this also applies to your coffee table, kitchen table, sofa, or favorite armchair, too. In my case, the beads tend to overflow from my little corner office desk in the living room into the dining room, into the bedroom, and even into the kitchen once in a while. Do those little beads have legs, or what?  Yes, I believe that beads take on a life of their own, moving where you are and multiplying very fast too. Although I have a designated workspace, my studio sometimes expands to the same places that Jennifer mentioned as well as a few other places. Sometimes I bead in the car, in a hotel room, and outside. Beads just pile up in unexpected places.

You might be a beader, if…you’ve ever made a New Year’s resolution to buy less beads and use more of what’s in your stash. Admit it, when you thought about what you wanted to change in 2013, you probably thought that you wanted to do more beading projects to use up all the beads you have in your stash. I did, too, until I saw that one of my favorite online bead suppliers had a brand-new stock of Rizo beads. That resolution didn’t even last a week, I’m ashamed to say.  The thing about using the term”stash” only really means that we want to keep something, not really keep it to use for a later date. Beaders get attached to their beads, it is one reason why it is sometimes hard to give my art away to the public, so much of an artist’s soul goes into creating the hand-made beads that I include in my jewelry art.  I did not resolve to buy less beads but, I did resolve to make more beads!

You might be a beader, if…you start six new beading projects before you finish the first one you originally started. This could be why my beads tend to spread themselves out all over the house. I started a bead-weaving project on one of my new Bead On It boards, and then before I was halfway finished with that one, I had an idea for another beading project that I just couldn’t wait to get started! Thankfully, I had another empty beading board, so I started that beading project. But then I ran out of room on my desk, so I parked the new project on the dining room table…and so on. It’s almost like I suffer from Beader’s Attention Deficit Disorder or something.  I tend to jump from work space to workspace within my studio if I am in the experimentation mood. Otherwise, I try to discipline myself.  I try to stick to one project at a time so that I can focus and dedicate the needed attention to one piece of art at a time, and check off the customer’s project as quickly and as professionally as I can without a start and stop interruptions.

A drawer full of brown seed beads, yet I can’t find just the right color… You might be a beader, if…you have four cabinets full of seed beads, but you don’t have just the right color for your current beading project. This happens to me all the time. Yes, I really have four cabinets, each with seven drawers, that are full of seed beads in pretty much every size, shape, and color you could imagine. So why is it that I can never find just the right color for my latest beaded jewelry design idea? I have no idea, but when this happens, it’s really hard to keep that resolution not to buy any more beads and use more of what’s in my stash.  I do not work with seed beads often enough to have a large collection of them.  I can see the problem of running out of them however, because they are often sold in small quantities and you never know when you need a huge amount for a project. I am unique to this situation because I am at an advantage in making my own beads. I create custom colors so I do not have to rely on a manufacturer supplying the “perfect” matching color.
You might be a beader, if…you’ll spend $300 on seed beads, but you buy all of your clothes at the local thrift shop. Not that shopping at the local thrift shop is a bad thing. I mean, my local thrift shop is where I found my favorite cheetah-print cashmere sweater for a mere $2! Saving money on clothes means more money for beads, right? (At least, that’s what I keep telling myself.)” It is true that if you are a beader, your perspective and priorities are different from others concerning extra cash.  I love to get that spree thrill rush from being in a bead or craft store and discovering all of the treasures there.  Bringing my bag of goodies home is like Christmas. I can’t wait to open the packages and get started on a project. Inspiration can come from a bag of  buttons, findings, wire or any other supply we use in our designs.

Jennifer and I both ask if you know anyone that has or does display behaviors like the suggestions above.  We both agree that there is no cure for being a beader, and that using up beads in a vicious cycle of creation is a good thing.

If you would like to experience the beads that have been in my stash and used for Club Creative Studio art, please visit the evolving inventory on the website:

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

 

Advertisements

Christmas Crunch- It’s Bow Time!

21 Dec

Are you feeling the Christmas crunch? Club Creative Studio is sharing creative information about how to make your gifts look special for the holiday season and beyond.

Zentangle Zen

26 Jul

In today’s Club Creative Studio’s TNT (This-N-That) post I again focus on creativity and  I once again invite you to discover.

I have happily discovered an old method of creating has a different name associated with it.  I will write about this particular subject twice.  In today’s post I will introduce to you a process of thought and creation and then on September 07, 2012 I will share my results of what I speak of today, after I take my formal and official instructional class for this particular method. I will hopefully find my zen when I Zentangle.

As a bit of background, before I tell you what Zentangle refers to, I went to my local library yesterday for the first time and discovered some useful information.

I have recently relocated and I am still getting my community introductions and barring.  The library is always on the list early to visit whenever I move because of the valuable resources it provides.  As I browse through the library, much like I would a department store, I take note of the written material on book shelves and also in paper flyer form stacked in revolving shelves or on counter tops.

Those little sheets of paper tell a lot about what is going on and how active the atmosphere is. Take note of those bright-colored half sheets because they are the key to the involvement and excitement of the efforts of the library.  It is a sign that there are little extra investments and opportunities to learn besides checking out the books and taking them home for a bit.

Of course, anything with a graphic on it catches my eye so that is no surprise to anyone who knows me or is drawn to anything dealing with an art form of some type.  This particular flyer caught my attention.  Although it was a black and white half sheet of paper, it was very graphic with three samples of art associated with the layout.  It also had a strange title. What was that about? Really, this is going to be about the process of how to make a simple line drawing look complex and appreciate the negative and positive areas in a line drawing.

I am ready to make a point with my art!

The information was an offering to take part in an easy-to-learn method of creating images with repetitive pattern.  SIGN ME UP! Sounds good to me!

To further explain, the “method” is a registered trademark method called: Zentangle.  I will be taking this “class” from a Certified Zentangle Teacher on September 06, 2012.

The Zentangle method is a way to gain relaxation and express creativity at the same time.  Who would not want that?  Without taking part in this particular method yet, I can only speak of what it claims to do for the artist. It is said to be fun and relaxing. Almost anyone can use it  and the end result is the creation  of beautiful images.

If you have ever doodled with a purpose this is a bit of the same, only with a name!

You may also have heard the term “Zendoodle” which sums up this project outcome as well.  Zentangle is thought to increase focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction along with an increased sense of personal well-being. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world across a wide range of skills, interests and ages.  The Zentangle method is said to be an elegant metaphor for deliberate artistry in life.

Today’s challenge is to simply watch this video again and get inspired.  Perhaps being interested you may also take a class, purchase a kit, get your own materials, discover other artist doing Zentangle images or visit blogs or websites featuring their gallery creations in this technique.  Don’t forget to stop by this blog again to see my results.

On September 07, 2012, I will share with you my first official creation developed specifically after taking a certified class from my CZT instructor.  Have fun Being Creative Everyday!  Are you inspired? Please recommend this blog and pass along the creative vibes.  The world needs information about art and artful creations to make it a more beautiful place to live!

Give Me a Break

2 Jul

Club Creative Studio strives to Be Creative Everyday.  Although there are times when distractions in the day prevent total focus, most days are productive work times that stretch into several hours of dedicated creative time.  What do you do when your creative brain needs a break? Do the things that make you the version of YOU you want to be.

Sometimes it is most helpful for me to try to break up the day into mini-work sessions, to prevent burn-out.   If there is a need for a “supply run”, I use that as a much-needed time to just chill from a project. Not to mention allowing for time to work in spurts, divides up your day so that you can do other things of importance.  When I break up my creative work day, I am able to schedule in time to get away for a few miles of running.  How about that for time management?

For the most part, I try to get a full day of creative work into each of my days, so that the weekends can be a choice work day or a day of inspiration and no hands-on work.  My job doesn’t always mean that I am at the design table.  Some days are spent in a library, at a craft store, on the computer, networking with like-minded people, in a museum, or just in an inspirational place to blog. No matter the place, I feel that I can be as productively creative as I wish with a little dedication and planning.  A task for most people is not to be creative in the first place but, to have the desire to remain creative and not fear running out of the creative juice.  Taking a break now and then gives back the full glass of creative juice.

Why are people creative in the first place? I think that although creativity can be obtained, it is a natural want and need for the art-minded folk.  It is an inborn desire to outwardly express what is inside.  There is a consistent drive to want to explore and experiment with new materials and techniques.  A need to want to figure out what can be produced with ideas and prompts.  It is a challenge to create something interesting and different and the thrill of completing something visually satisfying is worth the time invested in creation.

Taking breaks provide a chance to rest the mind from over-creativity (if there is such a thing). Recharging in any field can be an opportunity to step back and learn in a different way.  Without getting too lazy, step away but, not too long.  Take a break for a few minutes, hours, days or even a week.  You may need a break to become even more productive. It may prove to be the time you may need to appreciate your past efforts and miss the inner drive that you have to get cranking once again with your creative thoughts. Only you know what type of break you need to be the best version of YOU.

Lately for me, there is a resurgence of a new regiment that will give me added energy and drive to make my creative hours even more clear and focused.  I will write about that in another post.  It is the added regiment of running. What do you do when you need a break from creative thinking or creative production?  How does taking a break revive your creativity?

Don’t let your creativity escape you.  Use it and create a pace for it so that is ever-lasting.

The Waiting Game

10 May

Smile during your creative process.

Today’s TNT (This-N-That) post from Club Creative Studio is about technique in your creative process. I often find myself playing “the waiting game”.  You know what this means to an individual on a daily basis. We wait in line, we wait for the mail to come, we wait in traffic, we wait for the dryer to signal the clothes are dry. We wait for the text response, we wait for something to download, we WAIT, WAIT, WAIT!

But wait there is more waiting if you are an artist!  It is what we do with that “wait time” when we are creatively working that is important.  When an artist has down time, time in which we have to wait for something to dry, wait for something to stick together, wait for something to cure, melt, mold, bake, even sell… we need to also occupy that time to be productive.  And guess what?  An artist usually fills their wait time with something that takes even more time to wait for, right?

I often find myself doing tasks in the studio that involve multiple skills, steps or focus.  It is just part of the nature of the beast of putting constructions together, that forces us to wait for one step to be completed before another is started.  Multitasking is nothing new.  Multi-focus is the skill that is in question.  Being able to move from one task to another quickly is productive if you are organized, goal-oriented, and patient.

Organize your stuff!

Organization

When your supplies and work space are organized, your efforts become smooth and there is less time dealing with details that waste time.

Organization offers the flow of creativity because you can see more clearly and tools are readily at hand where you expect them to be.

Order in your space allows you to see the process in front of you without distractions.

Striving to be more organized can form habits that are productive in day-to-day activities outside of your craft.

Set your goals.

Goal-Setting

Being goal-oriented means you have a focus and outcome in mind.  Sometimes in art, that has to be general since we want the over-all outcome to be creative, not totally predicted.

Knowing what you want to do at the start of a process stems from being organized and also grows out of having the foresight of knowing what supplies you need to begin step one.

Inspiration and goals can be used together to give you a mental snapshot of where you want your project to head.  Envisioning the plan and product together sparks creativity.

Patience

No doubt about it deadlines and creativity sometimes do not mesh well but, being patient does have its rewards for reaching a time related task.

Setting the pace for creativity will manage your time more effectively.  Leaving room in the day for trial and error accounts will be less stressful and more successful.

I practice being patient by moving from one task to another.  I try not to get too frustrated with various steps of a complicated or intense project at hand because of those little breaks.

Take into account what your starting point and ending points look like.

Are you organized?

Do you know your goals for your creative process?

Are you patient?

I would like to end this post by sharing one idea that helps me pass time in between projects.  The focus on the REWARD, which is different from the word GOAL.  As a “reward” to myself as a job well done creatively and in celebration of an accomplished task, I take time to savor.  Chocolate and tea work for me!

My “pick-me-up-reward beverage” choice is sweet tea!

Let us know what you do in your daily “waiting game” challenges.  Do you have a routine or helpful hint for others that explains why you can be more creative during the times you have to wait in between steps of a project?  We’d love for you to share your thoughts below in a comment. Thanks for stopping by the blog,  Good luck in your creativity today!

>Keepin’ It Fresh

21 May

>A creative person for the most part… feels the need to create on many different levels. Creating the same type of art or craft in the same way may make for an “master of technique” but, that isn’t always enough. Speaking for myself and perhaps others, the additional challenge comes by way of how something can be created differently. Using your trial, errors, and successes to create a new product or different method of creation all together is challenging but rewarding.

Providing yourself with opportunities to “keep it fresh” challenges you to explore your own limitations and scope of imagination. Remember the phases of Picasso, for example in the Rose Period or Blue Period? If an artist does not try something new from time to time, their art may become routine to them and show in their expressive work. I even find that I am more productive if I allow myself to move around my work station, to work on several tasks at one session. If I get frustrated or distracted, I simply move to a different focus area and carry on. My productivity is not interrupted, it is merely switched in tasks. This is not always my consistent method or usual work ethic but, I allow myself the option of moving on from a project if I need a fresh view of something else. It’s a “re-focus” time so to speak.

For the sake of keeping products fresh, developing new line items is also an important expansion effort. I am on a continuous hunt for a variety of ways that I can possibly incorporate my hand made beads. Club Creative Studio is about to launch a few new concepts. Each new line item is planned and perfected to showcase the hand-made beads we create. We strive to provide a festive decorative item as well as a uniquely functional object of art. Also, our mantra/motto: “Art That Sets You Apart” is a constant reminder that our art must continue to hit the mark in originality. And it is great to have a goal to work toward on a daily basis.
It is that particular challenge that is also a rewarding aspect of creating in the first place.

%d bloggers like this: